AWG to CRC

AWG - Aruban Florin (Afl.)
CRC - Costa Rican Colón ()
1 AWG1 CRC

Currency conversion rates from AWG to CRC

AWGCRC
1 AWG1 CRC
5 AWG5 CRC
10 AWG10 CRC
20 AWG20 CRC
50 AWG50 CRC
100 AWG100 CRC
250 AWG250 CRC
500 AWG500 CRC
1000 AWG1000 CRC
2000 AWG2000 CRC
5000 AWG5000 CRC
10000 AWG10000 CRC
CRCAWG
1 CRC1 AWG
5 CRC5 AWG
10 CRC10 AWG
20 CRC20 AWG
50 CRC50 AWG
100 CRC100 AWG
250 CRC250 AWG
500 CRC500 AWG
1000 CRC1000 AWG
2000 CRC2000 AWG
5000 CRC5000 AWG
10000 CRC10000 AWG

AWG - Aruban Florin (AWG)

Aruban Florin

The Aruban Florin is pegged to the US Dollar at 1.79 Florin = 1 USD. The Central Bank of Aruba issues the currerncy. Aruba is a 33-km long island in the southern Caribbean Sea, 27 km north of the coast of Venezuela and approximately 130 km east of the peninsula of Guajira in Colombia. Together with Bonaire and Curacao, it is part of a group known as the ABC islands of the Leeward Antilles, the southern island chain of the Lesser Antilles.

The Aruban Florin is the currency in Aruba (AW, ABW). The Aruban Florin is also known as the Aruba Guilder, and the Aruban Gulden. The symbol for AWG can be written Afl. The Aruban Florin is divided into 100 cents. The exchange rate for the Aruban Florin was last updated on May 24, 2019 from Yahoo Finance. The AWG conversion factor has 3 significant digits.

Economy

  • Aruba enjoys one of the highest living standards in the Caribbean region and has a low unemployment rate.
  • Tourism and related activities account for about 75% of Aruba’s GNP. Most tourists are from Venezuela or the United States.
  • Before the “Status Aparte”, when Aruba became a separate, completely autonomous country/state in the kingdom of the Netherlands, oil processing was the dominant industry in spite of the expanding tourism sector.
  • Today the influence of the oil processing business is minimal. The agricultural and manufacturing sectors are also minimal.

History

  • In 1986, the Aruban Florin replaced the Netherlands Antillean Guilder, inheriting its peg to the United States Dollar. Coins were introduced in denominations of 5, 10, 25 and 50 cents, as well as 1 and 2½ guilders. Later, the 5-florin note was replaced by a square coin and the 2½ guilder coin was discontinued.
  • In 2005 the 5-florin note was replaced by a gold coin. All coins are struck in nickel-steel except the 5-guilder, which is a combination of copper and other metals. The 50-cent coin is the only square coin and is also known as the Yotin.

More information about AWG - Aruban Florin (AWG)


CRC - Costa Rican Colón ()

Costa Rican Colón

The Costa Rican Colon (CRC) is the currency of Costa Rica. The symbol for the Colon is ₡; the currency is subdivided into 100 centimos. Many places in Costa Rica accept the US Dollar unofficially. The name of the Colon is derived from the Spanish explorer Christopher Columbus (Cristobal Colon in Spanish).

The Costa Rican Colon is the currency in Costa Rica (CR, CRI). The symbol for CRC can be written C. The Costa Rican Colon is divided into 100 centimos. The exchange rate for the Costa Rican Colon was last updated on May 24, 2019 from Yahoo Finance. The CRC conversion factor has 5 significant digits.

Economy

  • Costa Rica’s main income is from agriculture, tourism, and electronics.
  • The service industry accounts for 68% of the country’s GDP.
  • The main industries are textiles, clothing, plastic products, food processing, fertilizer, microprocessors, construction material, and medical equipment.
  • Export products are coffee, bananas, sugar, seafood, medical equipment, ornamental plants, electronics, and pineapples.
  • Import products are consumer goods, petroleum, raw as well as construction materials, and capital equipment.
  • The unemployment rate is 7.8%.
  • GDP growth is currently ~-1%.

History

  • In 1896, the Costa Rican Peso was replaced by the Costa Rican Colon.
  • In 1897, new coins were issued.
  • Between 1917 and 1919, a subunit, the centavo, was introduced at 1/100 of a Colon. The country issued 5 centavos and 10 centavos in place of centimos. During that time 50 centavo coins were minted but never distributed.
  • From 1914 to 1938, the International Bank of Costa Rica issued and distributed 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 Colones notes. In the same period the National Bank of Costa Rica became the official bank for issuing paper money; they printed notes from 1937 to 1949.
  • During the 1950s the Central Bank of Costa Rica started issuing banknotes.
  • In 1958, the Central Bank added 1,000 colon notes to the range.
  • In 2010, Costa Rican Colon notes were replaced by a new issue.

More information about CRC - Costa Rican Colón ()