BYR to CUC

BYR - Belarusian Ruble (p.)
CUC - Cuban Convertible Peso (CUC)
1 BYR1 CUC

Currency conversion rates from BYR to CUC

BYRCUC
1 BYR1 CUC
5 BYR5 CUC
10 BYR10 CUC
20 BYR20 CUC
50 BYR50 CUC
100 BYR100 CUC
250 BYR250 CUC
500 BYR500 CUC
1000 BYR1000 CUC
2000 BYR2000 CUC
5000 BYR5000 CUC
10000 BYR10000 CUC
CUCBYR
1 CUC1 BYR
5 CUC5 BYR
10 CUC10 BYR
20 CUC20 BYR
50 CUC50 BYR
100 CUC100 BYR
250 CUC250 BYR
500 CUC500 BYR
1000 CUC1000 BYR
2000 CUC2000 BYR
5000 CUC5000 BYR
10000 CUC10000 BYR

BYR - Belarusian Ruble (2000–2016) (p.)

Belarusian Ruble (2000–2016)

The official currency of Belarus is the Belarusian Ruble (BYR). The symbol used for the Belarusian Ruble is Br. Two ruble series editions were introduced. In 2008, the Belarusian Ruble was tied to the US Dollar rather than to the Russian Ruble, though it is not an official peg.

The Old Belarusian Ruble is the currency in Belarus (BY, BLR, Belorussia). The symbol for BYR can be written BR. The exchange rate for the Old Belarusian Ruble was last updated on May 24, 2019 from Yahoo Finance. The BYR conversion factor has 3 significant digits.

Economy

  • The Belarus economy shows a stable economic growth of 9%.
  • The main industries are radios, textiles, refrigerators, televisions, trucks, tractors, earthmovers, radios, metal cutting, motorcycles, and machine tools.
  • Agriculture accounts for 11% of the total GDP.
  • Peat is the main mineral resource; it is used for fertilizer and in the chemical industry.
  • The economy is still dependent on Russia.
  • Inflation is estimated at 10% and the unemployment rate is estimated at 8%.
  • 80% of the industry-based economy is controlled by the state.
  • The educational level in Belarus is high, and the country has a large agricultural base.
  • In 1991, companies started the privatization process; however, most of the privatization has been re-nationalized.
  • Belarus is changing from a state-run economy to a free-market system.
  • The country imports oil and gas from Russia.

History

  • The first Belarusian Ruble was introduced in 1992, because Belarus did not have a license to print Soviet Union banknotes.
  • In 2000, the second Belarusian Ruble was introduced to replace the first at a rate of 1,000 old Rubles = 1 new Ruble. Only banknotes and commemorative coins were issued.
  • Only banknotes were issued in 2000.
  • In 2009, the Central Bank of Belarus reduced the exchange rate by +/- 20%.
  • In 2011, the Central Bank of Belarus again reduced the exchange rate by +/- 56%.

More information about BYR - Belarusian Ruble (2000–2016) (p.)


CUC - Cuban Convertible Peso (CUC$)

Cuban Convertible Peso

The Cuban Convertible Peso (CUC) is one of two currencies used in Cuba. The other currency is simply called the Cuban Peso and has been in limited use since 1994. Retail stores and other businesses mainly use the Cuban Convertible Peso. The Convertible Peso can only be exchanged in Cuba itself. It is pegged to the US Dollar at par. The Convertible Peso is rated as the strongest Peso currency, as well as the 10th highest currency worldwide.

The Cuban Convertible Peso is the currency in Cuba (CU, CUB). The exchange rate for the Cuban Convertible Peso was last updated on Today from The International Monetary Fund. The CUC conversion factor has 6 significant digits.

Economy

  • Cuba’s economy is run by the state and seen as a planned economy.
  • The majority of the labor force works for the government. The unemployment rate is 1.7%.
  • Services account for 74% of the total GDP.
  • Top industries are tobacco, petroleum, steel, cement, pharmaceuticals, construction, nickel, agricultural machines, and sugar.
  • Export products are tobacco, shellfish, coffee, citrus, and medical products.
  • Import products are chemicals, equipment and machinery, food, and petroleum.
  • Cuba recently started attracting world-class pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.
  • 80% of Cuba’s food is imported.
  • Tourism is growing rapidly, however the retail sector in Cuba is poorly run.
  • The Netherlands is the largest importer of Cuban products.

History

  • In 1994, the Cuban Convertible Peso was introduced alongside the existing Cuban Peso.
  • Until 2004, Cuba used the Peso (CUP) for non-luxury items and staples; the Convertible Peso and the US Dollar were used mainly in the tourism trade and for luxury items.
  • In 2004, the USD was take off the market due to sanctions. A 10% tax was charged for converting USDs to convertible pesos. This tax does not apply to any other currency.
  • In 2011, Cuba pegged the Convertible Peso to the USD at par.

More information about CUC - Cuban Convertible Peso (CUC$)