GNF to CRC

GNF - Guinean Franc (FG)
CRC - Costa Rican Colón ()
1 GNF1 CRC

Currency conversion rates from GNF to CRC

GNFCRC
1 GNF1 CRC
5 GNF5 CRC
10 GNF10 CRC
20 GNF20 CRC
50 GNF50 CRC
100 GNF100 CRC
250 GNF250 CRC
500 GNF500 CRC
1000 GNF1000 CRC
2000 GNF2000 CRC
5000 GNF5000 CRC
10000 GNF10000 CRC
CRCGNF
1 CRC1 GNF
5 CRC5 GNF
10 CRC10 GNF
20 CRC20 GNF
50 CRC50 GNF
100 CRC100 GNF
250 CRC250 GNF
500 CRC500 GNF
1000 CRC1000 GNF
2000 CRC2000 GNF
5000 CRC5000 GNF
10000 CRC10000 GNF

CRC - Costa Rican Colón ()

Costa Rican Colón

The Costa Rican Colon (CRC) is the currency of Costa Rica. The symbol for the Colon is ₡; the currency is subdivided into 100 centimos. Many places in Costa Rica accept the US Dollar unofficially. The name of the Colon is derived from the Spanish explorer Christopher Columbus (Cristobal Colon in Spanish).

The Costa Rican Colon is the currency in Costa Rica (CR, CRI). The symbol for CRC can be written C. The Costa Rican Colon is divided into 100 centimos. The exchange rate for the Costa Rican Colon was last updated on May 24, 2019 from Yahoo Finance. The CRC conversion factor has 5 significant digits.

Economy

  • Costa Rica’s main income is from agriculture, tourism, and electronics.
  • The service industry accounts for 68% of the country’s GDP.
  • The main industries are textiles, clothing, plastic products, food processing, fertilizer, microprocessors, construction material, and medical equipment.
  • Export products are coffee, bananas, sugar, seafood, medical equipment, ornamental plants, electronics, and pineapples.
  • Import products are consumer goods, petroleum, raw as well as construction materials, and capital equipment.
  • The unemployment rate is 7.8%.
  • GDP growth is currently ~-1%.

History

  • In 1896, the Costa Rican Peso was replaced by the Costa Rican Colon.
  • In 1897, new coins were issued.
  • Between 1917 and 1919, a subunit, the centavo, was introduced at 1/100 of a Colon. The country issued 5 centavos and 10 centavos in place of centimos. During that time 50 centavo coins were minted but never distributed.
  • From 1914 to 1938, the International Bank of Costa Rica issued and distributed 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 Colones notes. In the same period the National Bank of Costa Rica became the official bank for issuing paper money; they printed notes from 1937 to 1949.
  • During the 1950s the Central Bank of Costa Rica started issuing banknotes.
  • In 1958, the Central Bank added 1,000 colon notes to the range.
  • In 2010, Costa Rican Colon notes were replaced by a new issue.

More information about CRC - Costa Rican Colón ()


GNF - Guinean Franc (GNF)

Guinean Franc

The Guinea Franc is the official currency of Guinea, a country located in West Africa. It is divided into eight administrative regions and subdivided into thirty-three prefectures. Conakry is the capital, largest city and economic center. Other major cities include Labe, Nzérékoré, Kankan, Kindia, Mamou, Boke, and Guéckédou.

The Guinean Franc is the currency in Guinea (GN, GIN). The Guinean Franc is also known as Franc Guineen. The symbol for GNF can be written FG. The exchange rate for the Guinean Franc was last updated on May 24, 2019 from Yahoo Finance. The GNF conversion factor has 5 significant digits.

Economy

  • Guinea has abundant natural resources, including 25% or more of the world's known reserves of bauxite, more than 4 million tons of high grade iron ore, significant diamond and gold deposits, and undetermined reserves of uranium. Bauxite and aluminum are currently the only major exports.
  • The country has great potential for hydroelectric power.
  • Other industries include processing plants for beer, juices, beverages and snuff.
  • Under French rule, Guinea was a major exporter of bananas, pineapples, coffee, peanuts and palm oil. Agriculture still employs 80% of the workforce in the country.
  • Guinea has considerable potential for growth in its agricultural and fisheries sectors. Soil conditions, water and climate provide opportunities for large-scale irrigated agriculture and agribusiness. Investment opportunities and commercial activities exist in all these areas, but Guinea's poorly developed infrastructure and rampant corruption present obstacles to investment projects on a large scale.

History

  • The first Guinea Franc was introduced in 1959 to replace the CFA Franc BCEAO. The Guinea Franc denominations included 1, 5, 10 and 25 coins (aluminum bronze) with banknotes in 50, 100, 500, 1000, 5000 and 10,000 franc denominations.
  • These denominations have been maintained, with the addition of a 50 franc coin (1994) and phasing out of the corresponding 50 franc note.

More information about GNF - Guinean Franc (GNF)