NPR to MNT

NPR - Nepalese Rupee (नेरू)
MNT - Mongolian Tugrik ()
1 NPR1 MNT

Currency conversion rates from NPR to MNT

NPRMNT
1 NPR1 MNT
5 NPR5 MNT
10 NPR10 MNT
20 NPR20 MNT
50 NPR50 MNT
100 NPR100 MNT
250 NPR250 MNT
500 NPR500 MNT
1000 NPR1000 MNT
2000 NPR2000 MNT
5000 NPR5000 MNT
10000 NPR10000 MNT
MNTNPR
1 MNT1 NPR
5 MNT5 NPR
10 MNT10 NPR
20 MNT20 NPR
50 MNT50 NPR
100 MNT100 NPR
250 MNT250 NPR
500 MNT500 NPR
1000 MNT1000 NPR
2000 MNT2000 NPR
5000 MNT5000 NPR
10000 MNT10000 NPR

MNT - Mongolian Tugrik (MNT)

Mongolian Tugrik

The Mongolian Tögrög or Tugrik is the official currency of Mongolia. The banknotes are in denominations of 1, 3, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000; coins are in denominations of 20, 50, 100, and 200. Importing of local currency is limited to 815 Tugrik. Exporting local and foreign currencies is also limited to 815 Tugrik.

The Mongolian Tugrik is the currency in Mongolia (MN, MNG). The symbol for MNT can be written Tug. The Mongolian Tugrik is divided into 100 mongos. The exchange rate for the Mongolian Tugrik was last updated on May 24, 2019 from Yahoo Finance. The MNT conversion factor has 5 significant digits.

Economy

  • Mongolia’s economy has relied on the agricultural and herding sectors.
  • The country has extensive mineral deposits.
  • The economy improved in 2002–2003 as a result of increased copper and gold production.
  • The Mongolian economy is highly sensitive to activity in neighboring countries. For instance, Mongolia relies on Russia for >90% of its petroleum product imports as well as a high proportion of its electric power, making the country very susceptible to price increases.
  • Mongolia’s main export trading partner is China, which is also considered Mongolia’s “shadow” economy.
  • In 1997 Mongolia joined the World Trade Organization and intends to join Asian regional economic and trade organizations.

History

  • On April 1, 1928 the Tugrik replaced the Mongolian Dollar and other currencies and became the only legal currency in Mongolia.
  • Before other currencies were used in Mongolia, the mongo was also part of the currency history. It is no longer in the circulation because of its very low value. They became collectibles and novelties for tourists on the country.
  • In 2010, the ratio of Tugrik to US Dollar increased by 15% - the highest exchange rate gain in the world.

More information about MNT - Mongolian Tugrik (MNT)


NPR - Nepalese Rupee ()

Nepalese Rupee

The Rupee is the official currency of Nepal and is divided into 100 paisa. The Nepal Rastra Bank controls the issuing of currency. Unlike many countries, Nepal has three main exchange rates: the Rastra Bank rates (the government’s official rate), the private banks’ rate (slightly more generous), and the black market rate (the most generous, set by carpet shops and travel agents). When you leave Nepal from the Kathmandu airport, you will be limited on how many Rupees you can convert back to foreign currency. Only up to 10% of total of all receipts for exchanges from foreign currency into rupees will be converted back to international currencies.

The Nepalese Rupee is the currency in Nepal (NP, NPL). The symbol for NPR can be written NRs. The Nepalese Rupee is divided into 100 paise. The exchange rate for the Nepalese Rupee was last updated on January 18, 2019 from The International Monetary Fund. The NPR conversion factor has 6 significant digits.

Economy

  • Nepal’s GDP was most recently estimated at over US$12 billion (2008). GDP is comprised primarily of services (41%) and agriculture (40%), though agriculture employs roughly 75% of the country’s 10 million person workforce. The major types of produce include tea, rice, corn, wheat, sugarcane, milk, and water buffalo meat. Skilled labor represents one of the biggest impediments to economic growth.
  • Roughly 25% of the population lives below the international poverty line (US$1.25 per day). Nepal is a recipient of aid from many Asian, North American, and European nations.
  • Exports primarily consist of commodities (gold, machinery, petroleum products, fertilizer), textiles (carpets, leather goods, clothing), and grains.

History

  • In 1932, the Rupee was introduced, replacing the silver Mohar at a rate of two Mohar = one Rupee. In Nepalese, mohru was the first name of the Rupee.
  • In 1933, the value of the Nepalese Rupee was pegged to the Indian Rupee at a rate of 1.6 Nepalese Rupees = 1 Indian Rupee.
  • In the 1940s and 1950’s, coins were made from nickel, brass, and bronze.
  • In 1966, aluminum coins were introduced to replace the smaller denomination 1, 2, and 5 paisa, and brass coins replaced the 10 paisa coin.
  • Banknotes were introduced in 1951, in 1, 5, 10, and 100 Rupee denominations. 500 and 1,000 Rupee notes were added in 1972.

More information about NPR - Nepalese Rupee ()